Amazing Environmental Audio from Maha Kumbh Mela

I’ve been back from India just over a year now, back living in the US and in that time its been a real struggle, both on a personal level and financially.
Looking back on that time, a half-year spent in India, thinking about it and thinking about how much I miss it, and yearn for the Utopian chaos to run through my veins once more.
I have edited my photography over and over trying to extract the essence of the experience. However the personal journey that India was to me, has obscured my objectivity, something that only time can distill.
I have started once again on the editing process, going back over the audio recordings I made, and in doing so, had an epiphany about the work. I realize that I have no choice but to go back to India, and capture more audio, this time with an expanded kit. And to dedicate much more time and effort into making quality environmental recordings.
Audio recordings offer a taste of reality that video and photography simply cannot touch. Where video has to be constructed to make a compelling presentation, and photography provides specificity, and depth, that depth is within just that contextual intimacy.
Audio offers a living reality of time based exploration. Audio treats the consciousness to a wide layered mental vision, one that the mind is intrinsically connected to, there is no learning to listen, whereas there is learning to read photographs.

This Location Sound during the Anup Jalota concert at Pilot Baba’s Ashram camp 2013 Maha Kumbh Mela, Sangam Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh India. I had decided to walk around the sector 9 area where the ashram was located, about 7 miles from the actual main bathing area.
You can hear all of the local sounds, and the far distant sounds of the millions (130,000,000 to be more accurate) of pilgrims who existed at the ‘city’. Headphones highly recommended. Sit back and enjoy the Mela as I did for thirteen minutes.

2013 07 29 Where

I dont know how to do lots of things. There has always been heavy doubt in me. Its been my defining role in life. “I just dont know.”
Since returning from India, the act of leaving, going away and doing something –anything– the dont know seems less prevalent then it once was. Manifesting what I want seems a nudge easier then it was, but I still dont exactly know what I’m doing, and there is something in me that says now, that something will work out. Thats never before, been the light at the end of the tunnel for me. Theres always been this horrible sense of doubt and disbelief, where it comes from I cant exactly say, probably somewhere in my upbringing and whatever negative experiences that I accrued along the way and never learned from.

2013.05.30 BOMBAY

Bombay, not Mumbai. I prefer it, and the Bombers themselves call it Bombay anyway.

Its as hot as Goa was, but the humidity levels are off the charts. What I thought was humid in Goa was just for starters. Here its totally and completely insane. It takes 20 minutes to sweat out a liter of water. I go nowhere without a 2L bottle of Bisleri. Bisleri is the nice brand of water in India. Its an Indian company started by a French couple who came here some time ago and scoffed at the lack of good clean drinking water in bottles. Since then of course, there are others. Bailey, which is harder to find, but equally as good and the same price. 1L bottles are about 15 rupees, 2L bottles are 25 rupees, depending of course if you ask the price, because most street vendors will try and hoodwink you and make you pay more even thought he price is moderately unclearly marked on the bottles themselves. The Batch Number, date and Price “(inclusive of all taxes)”. But I still like to ask because I like to see the honesty levels of the vendors. Most outside of Goa and so far Bombay, are not honest and some, even when you show them the price will argue the price with you. Old school values; haggle. Theres no haggling in America. We are soft now, lazy, the price is the price. I still like to ask for a deal when I have to go to the Apple store just to fuck with the doe-eyed whizz-kid clerks. Who cares if Steve Jobs had $750,000,000,000 in the bank before he stepped out, he shouldn’t have had that much money anyway, he should have by virtue of the fact that he travelled India himself, known that that money would have been better off in the hands of those who know what to do with it to make their days a little brighter. Like those tribal families out there on the street in front of the hostel Im currently in. They are rolling with the rats, and their children are playing cricket and badminton amongst the traffic “OUT”! I saw that, that was out! Ballard market, haha what a fucking Joke, ‘fixed prices’ total and complete bullshit.
Oh look at that Im sweating as I’m shitting here in relative comfort of porcelain three floors above you, and the little brown children with blue string around their waists are dropping their payloads into cracks in the pavement. Their shit is cleaner then yours though -and you fucking better believe it.

 

Seattle Streetshooter

SEATTLE. Street photography. Downtown Seattle. Upon returning from almost six months in India, walking around the streets of downtown seattle is an interesting concept. Getting access to people in India is not even a consideration as people will generally walk up to you and either stare at you out of curiosity, or will stop and talk, and in some cases will look at you and get on with what they are doing. There was never any issue with my presence and if I asked 99% of the time people would be very happy to have their photograph taken.  Seattle however is radically different to this, mainly because of how we perceive ourselves let alone what we think of you the photographer.  It seems to me that in US individuality is championed and defended with great vigour, and the exact opposite is the case in India, where Indians generally see themselves as being part of a greater whole.  The construct as it seems to occur in the US is just that, a vague, preconceived, compartmentalisation of existence where everyone is happy in conviction that we are, in fact, individual, and yet confine ourselves in the routines we impose on ourselves and the things we do, places we go and the consumption patterns we cling to.  This is a thought that has been running around in my head for some years now, especially after having moved from one culture to another about a decade ago.  Im open to discussions on this.
SEATTLE. Street photography. Downtown Seattle. Upon returning from almost six months in India, walking around the streets of downtown seattle is an interesting concept. Getting access to people in India is not even a consideration as people will generally walk up to you and either stare at you out of curiosity, or will stop and talk, and in some cases will look at you and get on with what they are doing. There was never any issue with my presence and if I asked 99% of the time people would be very happy to have their photograph taken.
Seattle however is radically different to this, mainly because of how we perceive ourselves let alone what we think of you the photographer.
It seems to me that in US individuality is championed and defended with great vigour, and the exact opposite is the case in India, where Indians generally see themselves as being part of a greater whole.
The construct as it seems to occur in the US is just that, a vague, preconceived, compartmentalisation of existence where everyone is happy in conviction that we are, in fact, individual, and yet confine ourselves in the routines we impose on ourselves and the things we do, places we go and the consumption patterns we cling to.
This is a thought that has been running around in my head for some years now, especially after having moved from one culture to another about a decade ago.
Im open to discussions on this.
SEATTLE. Street photography. Downtown Seattle. Upon returning from almost six months in India, walking around the streets of downtown seattle is an interesting concept. Getting access to people in India is not even a consideration as people will generally walk up to you and either stare at you out of curiosity, or will stop and talk, and in some cases will look at you and get on with what they are doing. There was never any issue with my presence and if I asked 99% of the time people would be very happy to have their photograph taken.  Seattle however is radically different to this, mainly because of how we perceive ourselves let alone what we think of you the photographer.  It seems to me that in US individuality is championed and defended with great vigour, and the exact opposite is the case in India, where Indians generally see themselves as being part of a greater whole.  The construct as it seems to occur in the US is just that, a vague, preconceived, compartmentalisation of existence where everyone is happy in conviction that we are, in fact, individual, and yet confine ourselves in the routines we impose on ourselves and the things we do, places we go and the consumption patterns we cling to.  This is a thought that has been running around in my head for some years now, especially after having moved from one culture to another about a decade ago.  Im open to discussions on this.
SEATTLE. Street photography. Downtown Seattle. Upon returning from almost six months in India, walking around the streets of downtown seattle is an interesting concept. Getting access to people in India is not even a consideration as people will generally walk up to you and either stare at you out of curiosity, or will stop and talk, and in some cases will look at you and get on with what they are doing. There was never any issue with my presence and if I asked 99% of the time people would be very happy to have their photograph taken.
Seattle however is radically different to this, mainly because of how we perceive ourselves let alone what we think of you the photographer.
It seems to me that in US individuality is championed and defended with great vigour, and the exact opposite is the case in India, where Indians generally see themselves as being part of a greater whole.
The construct as it seems to occur in the US is just that, a vague, preconceived, compartmentalisation of existence where everyone is happy in conviction that we are, in fact, individual, and yet confine ourselves in the routines we impose on ourselves and the things we do, places we go and the consumption patterns we cling to.
This is a thought that has been running around in my head for some years now, especially after having moved from one culture to another about a decade ago.
Im open to discussions on this.
SEATTLE. Street photography. Downtown Seattle. Upon returning from almost six months in India, walking around the streets of downtown seattle is an interesting concept. Getting access to people in India is not even a consideration as people will generally walk up to you and either stare at you out of curiosity, or will stop and talk, and in some cases will look at you and get on with what they are doing. There was never any issue with my presence and if I asked 99% of the time people would be very happy to have their photograph taken.  Seattle however is radically different to this, mainly because of how we perceive ourselves let alone what we think of you the photographer.  It seems to me that in US individuality is championed and defended with great vigour, and the exact opposite is the case in India, where Indians generally see themselves as being part of a greater whole.  The construct as it seems to occur in the US is just that, a vague, preconceived, compartmentalisation of existence where everyone is happy in conviction that we are, in fact, individual, and yet confine ourselves in the routines we impose on ourselves and the things we do, places we go and the consumption patterns we cling to.  This is a thought that has been running around in my head for some years now, especially after having moved from one culture to another about a decade ago.  Im open to discussions on this.
SEATTLE. Street photography. Downtown Seattle. Upon returning from almost six months in India, walking around the streets of downtown seattle is an interesting concept. Getting access to people in India is not even a consideration as people will generally walk up to you and either stare at you out of curiosity, or will stop and talk, and in some cases will look at you and get on with what they are doing. There was never any issue with my presence and if I asked 99% of the time people would be very happy to have their photograph taken.
Seattle however is radically different to this, mainly because of how we perceive ourselves let alone what we think of you the photographer.
It seems to me that in US individuality is championed and defended with great vigour, and the exact opposite is the case in India, where Indians generally see themselves as being part of a greater whole.
The construct as it seems to occur in the US is just that, a vague, preconceived, compartmentalisation of existence where everyone is happy in conviction that we are, in fact, individual, and yet confine ourselves in the routines we impose on ourselves and the things we do, places we go and the consumption patterns we cling to.
This is a thought that has been running around in my head for some years now, especially after having moved from one culture to another about a decade ago.
Im open to discussions on this.
SEATTLE. Street photography. Downtown Seattle. Upon returning from almost six months in India, walking around the streets of downtown seattle is an interesting concept. Getting access to people in India is not even a consideration as people will generally walk up to you and either stare at you out of curiosity, or will stop and talk, and in some cases will look at you and get on with what they are doing. There was never any issue with my presence and if I asked 99% of the time people would be very happy to have their photograph taken.  Seattle however is radically different to this, mainly because of how we perceive ourselves let alone what we think of you the photographer.  It seems to me that in US individuality is championed and defended with great vigour, and the exact opposite is the case in India, where Indians generally see themselves as being part of a greater whole.  The construct as it seems to occur in the US is just that, a vague, preconceived, compartmentalisation of existence where everyone is happy in conviction that we are, in fact, individual, and yet confine ourselves in the routines we impose on ourselves and the things we do, places we go and the consumption patterns we cling to.  This is a thought that has been running around in my head for some years now, especially after having moved from one culture to another about a decade ago.  Im open to discussions on this.
SEATTLE. Street photography. Downtown Seattle. Upon returning from almost six months in India, walking around the streets of downtown seattle is an interesting concept. Getting access to people in India is not even a consideration as people will generally walk up to you and either stare at you out of curiosity, or will stop and talk, and in some cases will look at you and get on with what they are doing. There was never any issue with my presence and if I asked 99% of the time people would be very happy to have their photograph taken.
Seattle however is radically different to this, mainly because of how we perceive ourselves let alone what we think of you the photographer.
It seems to me that in US individuality is championed and defended with great vigour, and the exact opposite is the case in India, where Indians generally see themselves as being part of a greater whole.
The construct as it seems to occur in the US is just that, a vague, preconceived, compartmentalisation of existence where everyone is happy in conviction that we are, in fact, individual, and yet confine ourselves in the routines we impose on ourselves and the things we do, places we go and the consumption patterns we cling to.
This is a thought that has been running around in my head for some years now, especially after having moved from one culture to another about a decade ago.
Im open to discussions on this.
SEATTLE. Street photography. Downtown Seattle. Upon returning from almost six months in India, walking around the streets of downtown seattle is an interesting concept. Getting access to people in India is not even a consideration as people will generally walk up to you and either stare at you out of curiosity, or will stop and talk, and in some cases will look at you and get on with what they are doing. There was never any issue with my presence and if I asked 99% of the time people would be very happy to have their photograph taken.  Seattle however is radically different to this, mainly because of how we perceive ourselves let alone what we think of you the photographer.  It seems to me that in US individuality is championed and defended with great vigour, and the exact opposite is the case in India, where Indians generally see themselves as being part of a greater whole.  The construct as it seems to occur in the US is just that, a vague, preconceived, compartmentalisation of existence where everyone is happy in conviction that we are, in fact, individual, and yet confine ourselves in the routines we impose on ourselves and the things we do, places we go and the consumption patterns we cling to.  This is a thought that has been running around in my head for some years now, especially after having moved from one culture to another about a decade ago.  Im open to discussions on this.
SEATTLE. Street photography. Downtown Seattle. Upon returning from almost six months in India, walking around the streets of downtown seattle is an interesting concept. Getting access to people in India is not even a consideration as people will generally walk up to you and either stare at you out of curiosity, or will stop and talk, and in some cases will look at you and get on with what they are doing. There was never any issue with my presence and if I asked 99% of the time people would be very happy to have their photograph taken.
Seattle however is radically different to this, mainly because of how we perceive ourselves let alone what we think of you the photographer.
It seems to me that in US individuality is championed and defended with great vigour, and the exact opposite is the case in India, where Indians generally see themselves as being part of a greater whole.
The construct as it seems to occur in the US is just that, a vague, preconceived, compartmentalisation of existence where everyone is happy in conviction that we are, in fact, individual, and yet confine ourselves in the routines we impose on ourselves and the things we do, places we go and the consumption patterns we cling to.
This is a thought that has been running around in my head for some years now, especially after having moved from one culture to another about a decade ago.
Im open to discussions on this.

Just a reminder..

To anyone who has in their possession any of my images, video or sound recordings, that I have not given anyone any permission or license to use any of my images, and no such permission or license shall be implied by their possession of digital or otherwise electronic analog or physical copies of any of my images, video, sound recordings, and that I trust none of my images will be incorporated into any work, and that my policy is to aggressively defend my copyrights to the full extent of the law.

If you do have copies of my images, video or sound recordings and want to use them for any reason, you must contact me before hand without exception.

Goa to Mumbai

Bombay! Yes they are Dildos!
Bombay! Yes they are Dildos!
Bombay! Street children, have the world as their playground.
Bombay! Street children, have the world as their playground.
Bomba, there is always someone at work, and neary by street children play in the dust between the missing paving stones.
Bomba, there is always someone at work, and neary by street children play in the dust between the missing paving stones.
A workman walks past bails of fabric on a hand-cart in his ubiquitous Ghandi style garb and Nehru cap.
A workman walks past bails of fabric on a hand-cart in his ubiquitous Ghandi style garb and Nehru cap.
The single best thirst quencher is Cane Juice, there are literally thousands of stalls all over the metropolis selling Cane Juice which is prepared and crushed and mixed with lime or mint and sold for 10rs a glass. Its a sweet, cool light-green drink with a hint of cinnamon and a frothy head.
The single best thirst quencher is Cane Juice, there are literally thousands of stalls all over the metropolis selling Cane Juice which is prepared and crushed and mixed with lime or mint and sold for 10rs a glass. Its a sweet, cool light-green drink with a hint of cinnamon and a frothy head.
A flour Mill in Fort, Bombay India. Someones respected father represented ont he wall, and the eye-of-shiva marked on the portrait gives the scene an uncanny and humorous appeal. It reminds me of Carlos the Jackal.
A flour Mill in Fort, Bombay India. Someones respected father represented ont he wall, and the eye-of-shiva marked on the portrait gives the scene an uncanny and humorous appeal. It reminds me of Carlos the Jackal.
Bombay! The old part of the city, at its southern tip is an area called Fort, this is a mix of british and dutch colonial achitecture, as it was a dutch trading port before the British arrived. Parts of the city are wide tree-lined streets with beautiful Indian buildings, others wonderful British buildings which are still used today for state buildings and civil activities like the India Post building and CST which was formerly known as Victoria station, that building is a vast cavernous hulk with flying buttresses and warren-like interior housing hundreds of offices. In between the cracks lie the back-streets which are mind-blowing networks in impossibly small areas that accommodate millions of working indians who eek out their existences in stunning displays of resilience.
Bombay! The old part of the city, at its southern tip is an area called Fort, this is a mix of british and dutch colonial achitecture, as it was a dutch trading port before the British arrived.
Parts of the city are wide tree-lined streets with beautiful Indian buildings, others wonderful British buildings which are still used today for state buildings and civil activities like the India Post building and CST which was formerly known as Victoria station, that building is a vast cavernous hulk with flying buttresses and warren-like interior housing hundreds of offices.
In between the cracks lie the back-streets which are mind-blowing networks in impossibly small areas that accommodate millions of working indians who eek out their existences in stunning displays of resilience.
Bombay! These are typical workers on their way to or from work, their style is accommodating to extreme temperatures of 50+ centigrade, the garments are cheap but well tailored white cotton in the style of Jawahlal Nehru who was the first prime minister of India, a solid intelligent man who founded many of the principles of what are now considered the pillars of Indian modernity.
Bombay! These are typical workers on their way to or from work, their style is accommodating to extreme temperatures of 50+ centigrade, the garments are cheap but well tailored white cotton in the style of Jawahlal Nehru who was the first prime minister of India, a solid intelligent man who founded many of the principles of what are now considered the pillars of Indian modernity.
The slums of Mumbai, a truly heart warming experience which in many ways reminds me of the way life used to be when I was a child growing up in Ireland. Its an amazing experience to see how these people live, where everything is recycled, water is abundant and used for everything, children play, are happy, adults come and go out of the city to work and some work in the slums, but everyone is truly happy. There are no traffic jams, there is no ill-will, and there is mutually expressed respect amongst all.
The slums of Mumbai, a truly heart warming experience which in many ways reminds me of the way life used to be when I was a child growing up in Ireland. Its an amazing experience to see how these people live, where everything is recycled, water is abundant and used for everything, children play, are happy, adults come and go out of the city to work and some work in the slums, but everyone is truly happy. There are no traffic jams, there is no ill-will, and there is mutually expressed respect amongst all.
Amol, from Video Volunteers and India Unheard, shows us around the slums where he lives. Its an amazing experience to see how these people live, where everything is recycled, water is abundant and used for everything, children play, are happy, adults come and go out of the city to work and some work in the slums, but everyone is truly happy. There are no traffic jams, there is no ill-will, and there is mutually expressed respect amongst all.
Amol, from Video Volunteers and India Unheard, shows us around the slums where he lives. Its an amazing experience to see how these people live, where everything is recycled, water is abundant and used for everything, children play, are happy, adults come and go out of the city to work and some work in the slums, but everyone is truly happy. There are no traffic jams, there is no ill-will, and there is mutually expressed respect amongst all.
Bombay, aka Mumbai, its so hot, that there are no door on the trains, people hang out and off the trains as they bolt around the local intercity area. Rarely do accidents happen.
Bombay, aka Mumbai, its so hot, that there are no door on the trains, people hang out and off the trains as they bolt around the local intercity area. Rarely do accidents happen.

20130521.INDIA.GOA.JO©.0281

The monsoon is late and everything is dry, hard and thirsty. The locals are preparing hard for the oncoming torrential onslaught which is to last about twelve weeks.
The monsoon is late and everything is dry, hard and thirsty. The locals are preparing hard for the oncoming torrential onslaught which is to last about twelve weeks.
We came to get our milk back please, monsoon is late and the kids are getting hungry.
We came to get our milk back please, monsoon is late and the kids are getting hungry.

2013.05.09 7

I am in room Nothing. Im going to call it Seven. Its the joker in the pack of rooms Ive stayed in, in India so far. Bhopal, Goa, Kumbh, Varanasi, Pushkar, Bhopal, Goa. Seven Rooms, three of them were number 7, the rest didnt have any numbers, like this one, my brightly Orange Hindu bedroom #7.

Every room, starrts out as a functional respite from the rigours of travel, traversing ground over time to exist in another space for an alloted time. Every room, after a while becomes stagnant, and somewhat intolerable, a reminder of impersonal functionality it serves, imposing cost, and inevitable build up to departure to the next place. The space becomes familiar and a nest as best possible within the constraints. The room exists for a period and it is your prerogative to either ignore it and spend as much time out of it as possible, or to concede to it. There is no way of personalizing the space, as the knowledge exists that you will be leaving that room in a foreseeable period, and with that it becomes a crater for the veritable bag explosion when you are finally done with negotiations and finances. Just as quickly it becomes the events of the period which in some case are best left in the room when the door is closed and the bill is paid.

 

Its impossible to be tidy, your bag is designed to take as much as you brought and its designed to take that load utilizing every possible area of volume the space will take. So the contents spring out and are organized into whats needed, what is to be washed and what isn’t needed, which means piles.

If theres a desk it becomes my office, cables wires chargers batteries keys tools trinkets and gadgets adorn the surface. The equipment stays in the case because its safe from humidity, dust, heat and insects.

The bed becomes the other desk, designed perfectly to house everything at arms reach when you are laying under the 720rpm ceiling fan buffeting you with slightly cooler air, too drenched in your own sweat to contemplate anything other then momentary thoughts and vignettes of the days events before drifting in and out of sleep for the next five hours while fighting with mosquitos.