The Fucking 35 ‘cron

Ok so I’m in conversation with a friend and he mentions something about Leica lenses and trending prices of one versus the other, and then this just comes out of me like a projectile vom moment. It’s so good I’m blogging it. Slightly modified for context and clarity, sort of.

35 cron has always been THE lens to have with Leica cameras. It’s like a right of passage lens. It has nothing to do with the quality of optics or what people do with the lens, but it has this mythical status of achievement.
First you go from digital to film, and get into the film scene, and then you get a few fixed lens rangefinders and claw your way up through that lineage from cheap clean Konica’s to Yashica’s, Agfa’s, Olympus’s etc, and finally find that sweet Canonet, and lust for a QL17 GIII, and realize that it’s actually usable, and really produces some hot-shit pictures on your favorite film. Some people will go on to medium format beaters, and modular systems, Lomo, specialty, low financial impact cameras and into that camera obscurity rabbit hole.
Somewhere along the way you make the connection between that Canon/Nikon rebel and this new film thing your into, and start thinking about cameras that have lenses, and rangefinders and the Russian Fed/Voigtlander Bessa/Konica Hexar/bashed up Zeiss Ikon inevitably steps in and makes you a rangefinder photographer. Then its one, two, or a few used Screw mount Canon/Fed/Voigtlander lenses, and you’re always striving for that mountain peak of a Leica lens, and in the middle of all that comes a choice Zeiss ZM lens, something that puts you a little closer to that mountain peak.
One paycheck, after a christmas bonus or something, you can fill in the gap between your savings and that figure that sits in the back of your head, the one that you can deal with as a credit card debt, and that’s the day you can start getting serious about all those watched items in your My eBay, or forum classifieds, looking for that perfect Leica Camera deal. Whatever it is, maybe an M4, M2, M3 or even an M6. Your new bling Leica with your choice Zeiss, Voigtlander or Konica lens.
But in the end all you really want is that fucking 35 ‘cron.

Seattle Streetshooter

SEATTLE. Street photography. Downtown Seattle. Upon returning from almost six months in India, walking around the streets of downtown seattle is an interesting concept. Getting access to people in India is not even a consideration as people will generally walk up to you and either stare at you out of curiosity, or will stop and talk, and in some cases will look at you and get on with what they are doing. There was never any issue with my presence and if I asked 99% of the time people would be very happy to have their photograph taken.  Seattle however is radically different to this, mainly because of how we perceive ourselves let alone what we think of you the photographer.  It seems to me that in US individuality is championed and defended with great vigour, and the exact opposite is the case in India, where Indians generally see themselves as being part of a greater whole.  The construct as it seems to occur in the US is just that, a vague, preconceived, compartmentalisation of existence where everyone is happy in conviction that we are, in fact, individual, and yet confine ourselves in the routines we impose on ourselves and the things we do, places we go and the consumption patterns we cling to.  This is a thought that has been running around in my head for some years now, especially after having moved from one culture to another about a decade ago.  Im open to discussions on this.
SEATTLE. Street photography. Downtown Seattle. Upon returning from almost six months in India, walking around the streets of downtown seattle is an interesting concept. Getting access to people in India is not even a consideration as people will generally walk up to you and either stare at you out of curiosity, or will stop and talk, and in some cases will look at you and get on with what they are doing. There was never any issue with my presence and if I asked 99% of the time people would be very happy to have their photograph taken.
Seattle however is radically different to this, mainly because of how we perceive ourselves let alone what we think of you the photographer.
It seems to me that in US individuality is championed and defended with great vigour, and the exact opposite is the case in India, where Indians generally see themselves as being part of a greater whole.
The construct as it seems to occur in the US is just that, a vague, preconceived, compartmentalisation of existence where everyone is happy in conviction that we are, in fact, individual, and yet confine ourselves in the routines we impose on ourselves and the things we do, places we go and the consumption patterns we cling to.
This is a thought that has been running around in my head for some years now, especially after having moved from one culture to another about a decade ago.
Im open to discussions on this.
SEATTLE. Street photography. Downtown Seattle. Upon returning from almost six months in India, walking around the streets of downtown seattle is an interesting concept. Getting access to people in India is not even a consideration as people will generally walk up to you and either stare at you out of curiosity, or will stop and talk, and in some cases will look at you and get on with what they are doing. There was never any issue with my presence and if I asked 99% of the time people would be very happy to have their photograph taken.  Seattle however is radically different to this, mainly because of how we perceive ourselves let alone what we think of you the photographer.  It seems to me that in US individuality is championed and defended with great vigour, and the exact opposite is the case in India, where Indians generally see themselves as being part of a greater whole.  The construct as it seems to occur in the US is just that, a vague, preconceived, compartmentalisation of existence where everyone is happy in conviction that we are, in fact, individual, and yet confine ourselves in the routines we impose on ourselves and the things we do, places we go and the consumption patterns we cling to.  This is a thought that has been running around in my head for some years now, especially after having moved from one culture to another about a decade ago.  Im open to discussions on this.
SEATTLE. Street photography. Downtown Seattle. Upon returning from almost six months in India, walking around the streets of downtown seattle is an interesting concept. Getting access to people in India is not even a consideration as people will generally walk up to you and either stare at you out of curiosity, or will stop and talk, and in some cases will look at you and get on with what they are doing. There was never any issue with my presence and if I asked 99% of the time people would be very happy to have their photograph taken.
Seattle however is radically different to this, mainly because of how we perceive ourselves let alone what we think of you the photographer.
It seems to me that in US individuality is championed and defended with great vigour, and the exact opposite is the case in India, where Indians generally see themselves as being part of a greater whole.
The construct as it seems to occur in the US is just that, a vague, preconceived, compartmentalisation of existence where everyone is happy in conviction that we are, in fact, individual, and yet confine ourselves in the routines we impose on ourselves and the things we do, places we go and the consumption patterns we cling to.
This is a thought that has been running around in my head for some years now, especially after having moved from one culture to another about a decade ago.
Im open to discussions on this.
SEATTLE. Street photography. Downtown Seattle. Upon returning from almost six months in India, walking around the streets of downtown seattle is an interesting concept. Getting access to people in India is not even a consideration as people will generally walk up to you and either stare at you out of curiosity, or will stop and talk, and in some cases will look at you and get on with what they are doing. There was never any issue with my presence and if I asked 99% of the time people would be very happy to have their photograph taken.  Seattle however is radically different to this, mainly because of how we perceive ourselves let alone what we think of you the photographer.  It seems to me that in US individuality is championed and defended with great vigour, and the exact opposite is the case in India, where Indians generally see themselves as being part of a greater whole.  The construct as it seems to occur in the US is just that, a vague, preconceived, compartmentalisation of existence where everyone is happy in conviction that we are, in fact, individual, and yet confine ourselves in the routines we impose on ourselves and the things we do, places we go and the consumption patterns we cling to.  This is a thought that has been running around in my head for some years now, especially after having moved from one culture to another about a decade ago.  Im open to discussions on this.
SEATTLE. Street photography. Downtown Seattle. Upon returning from almost six months in India, walking around the streets of downtown seattle is an interesting concept. Getting access to people in India is not even a consideration as people will generally walk up to you and either stare at you out of curiosity, or will stop and talk, and in some cases will look at you and get on with what they are doing. There was never any issue with my presence and if I asked 99% of the time people would be very happy to have their photograph taken.
Seattle however is radically different to this, mainly because of how we perceive ourselves let alone what we think of you the photographer.
It seems to me that in US individuality is championed and defended with great vigour, and the exact opposite is the case in India, where Indians generally see themselves as being part of a greater whole.
The construct as it seems to occur in the US is just that, a vague, preconceived, compartmentalisation of existence where everyone is happy in conviction that we are, in fact, individual, and yet confine ourselves in the routines we impose on ourselves and the things we do, places we go and the consumption patterns we cling to.
This is a thought that has been running around in my head for some years now, especially after having moved from one culture to another about a decade ago.
Im open to discussions on this.
SEATTLE. Street photography. Downtown Seattle. Upon returning from almost six months in India, walking around the streets of downtown seattle is an interesting concept. Getting access to people in India is not even a consideration as people will generally walk up to you and either stare at you out of curiosity, or will stop and talk, and in some cases will look at you and get on with what they are doing. There was never any issue with my presence and if I asked 99% of the time people would be very happy to have their photograph taken.  Seattle however is radically different to this, mainly because of how we perceive ourselves let alone what we think of you the photographer.  It seems to me that in US individuality is championed and defended with great vigour, and the exact opposite is the case in India, where Indians generally see themselves as being part of a greater whole.  The construct as it seems to occur in the US is just that, a vague, preconceived, compartmentalisation of existence where everyone is happy in conviction that we are, in fact, individual, and yet confine ourselves in the routines we impose on ourselves and the things we do, places we go and the consumption patterns we cling to.  This is a thought that has been running around in my head for some years now, especially after having moved from one culture to another about a decade ago.  Im open to discussions on this.
SEATTLE. Street photography. Downtown Seattle. Upon returning from almost six months in India, walking around the streets of downtown seattle is an interesting concept. Getting access to people in India is not even a consideration as people will generally walk up to you and either stare at you out of curiosity, or will stop and talk, and in some cases will look at you and get on with what they are doing. There was never any issue with my presence and if I asked 99% of the time people would be very happy to have their photograph taken.
Seattle however is radically different to this, mainly because of how we perceive ourselves let alone what we think of you the photographer.
It seems to me that in US individuality is championed and defended with great vigour, and the exact opposite is the case in India, where Indians generally see themselves as being part of a greater whole.
The construct as it seems to occur in the US is just that, a vague, preconceived, compartmentalisation of existence where everyone is happy in conviction that we are, in fact, individual, and yet confine ourselves in the routines we impose on ourselves and the things we do, places we go and the consumption patterns we cling to.
This is a thought that has been running around in my head for some years now, especially after having moved from one culture to another about a decade ago.
Im open to discussions on this.
SEATTLE. Street photography. Downtown Seattle. Upon returning from almost six months in India, walking around the streets of downtown seattle is an interesting concept. Getting access to people in India is not even a consideration as people will generally walk up to you and either stare at you out of curiosity, or will stop and talk, and in some cases will look at you and get on with what they are doing. There was never any issue with my presence and if I asked 99% of the time people would be very happy to have their photograph taken.  Seattle however is radically different to this, mainly because of how we perceive ourselves let alone what we think of you the photographer.  It seems to me that in US individuality is championed and defended with great vigour, and the exact opposite is the case in India, where Indians generally see themselves as being part of a greater whole.  The construct as it seems to occur in the US is just that, a vague, preconceived, compartmentalisation of existence where everyone is happy in conviction that we are, in fact, individual, and yet confine ourselves in the routines we impose on ourselves and the things we do, places we go and the consumption patterns we cling to.  This is a thought that has been running around in my head for some years now, especially after having moved from one culture to another about a decade ago.  Im open to discussions on this.
SEATTLE. Street photography. Downtown Seattle. Upon returning from almost six months in India, walking around the streets of downtown seattle is an interesting concept. Getting access to people in India is not even a consideration as people will generally walk up to you and either stare at you out of curiosity, or will stop and talk, and in some cases will look at you and get on with what they are doing. There was never any issue with my presence and if I asked 99% of the time people would be very happy to have their photograph taken.
Seattle however is radically different to this, mainly because of how we perceive ourselves let alone what we think of you the photographer.
It seems to me that in US individuality is championed and defended with great vigour, and the exact opposite is the case in India, where Indians generally see themselves as being part of a greater whole.
The construct as it seems to occur in the US is just that, a vague, preconceived, compartmentalisation of existence where everyone is happy in conviction that we are, in fact, individual, and yet confine ourselves in the routines we impose on ourselves and the things we do, places we go and the consumption patterns we cling to.
This is a thought that has been running around in my head for some years now, especially after having moved from one culture to another about a decade ago.
Im open to discussions on this.